5 Things To Know Now That The Bear Is Here

Share Post: facebook Created with Sketch. twitter Created with Sketch. linkedin Created with Sketch. mail Created with Sketch. print Created with Sketch.
Dear Friends,

It finally happened. On Monday, June 13th, the S&P 500 Index moved into a bear market, finally closing 20% beneath the January 3 high. And then last week, the S&P 500 Index rebounded 6.46%, to bring the year-to-date return to -17.3%.

 

Here are 5 things to know about bear (and bull) markets:

 

1) Here are all the bear (and near bear markets) since 1950. This bear market is actually already old by recent standards. At more than five months old, it is already older than six other bear markets going back nearly 40 years. Only the tech bubble and Great Financial Crisis bears lasted longer.

 

This could mean the bear market could be closer to a bottom than many expect.

2) What could happen next? As we show in the LPL Research Chart of the Day, the good news is a year after the S&P 500 moves into a bear, stocks actually do pretty well, up an average of nearly 15% a year later with a very solid median gain of 23.8%.

 

The catch, and there’s always a catch, the returns a year later were negative in the 1973-74 recession, the tech bubble, and the Financial Crisis (2008-2009). The good news is we don’t see an economy like that over the next year, so the likelihood of higher prices (maybe significantly higher) is quite strong, in our view.

3) How quickly could stocks bottom? The data is all over the map here. It took only 11 days in March 2020 for the lows to form, while it took 18 months after the tech bubble. The bottom line, is we think this could play out more like things did in 1987 or the 1950s and 1960s with the ultimate low taking place sooner rather than later.
4) Looking at previous bears that took place without a recession (still our base case,) showed that stocks tend to bottom at a little more than down 20%. Yes, 1987 is in there, but most of the other times stocks bottomed near where we are now, suggesting potentially limited pain from current levels.

5) Since the S&P 500 Index moved to 500 stocks on March 4, 1957, it has made 1,184 new all-time highs and it has always eventually achieved new highs, even if it doesn’t feel that way today. Wars, sky-high inflation, recessions, bubbles, 100-year pandemics, geopolitical events, policy mistakes, and more have all happened over this time, but stocks have always come back eventually to new highs. We do not think this time will be any different. As long as businesses can grow earnings over the long run, the fundamentals are in place for future stock gains, which means new highs could be coming as well.

 

They say the stock market is the only place things go on sale and people run out of the store screaming. Please remember that before you make any rash investment decisions.

 

Please reach out with any questions.

 

Debbie

Share:
facebook Created with Sketch. twitter Created with Sketch. linkedin Created with Sketch. mail Created with Sketch. print Created with Sketch.
Share Post: facebook Created with Sketch. twitter Created with Sketch. linkedin Created with Sketch. mail Created with Sketch. print Created with Sketch.

RECENT POSTS

Charitable Giving Strategies in a High-Income Year

Tom Fridrich, JD, CLUⓇ, ChFCⓇ, Senior Wealth Planner  The end of the year offers an ideal opportunity to look both forward and back — reflecting on recent achievements, while setting goals for the upcoming months. For many of my clients, it’s also a time to review their finances and i …

Let’s Talk About Midterm Elections and Your Investments

This week was midterm elections and we’ve had many questions about what it all could mean, which we’ll tackle in today’s blog. We consider it a great honor to vote, and while we may not know the final results of the election for days (or even months), what we do know is the election will …

Traditional IRA & Roth Conversion

If you have a Traditional IRA, you may benefit from doing a Roth conversion this year (and if you already performed a conversion this year, you still have time to do an additional conversion before year end). We typically favor Roth IRAs (over Traditional IRA balances) as Roth IRAs grow tax …

3 Nontraditional Ways to Give That Still Qualify for a Tax Deduction

Kevin Oleszewski, Senior Wealth Planner ‘Tis the season to give. In fact, 37% of charitable giving occurs during the last quarter of the year — 20% of it in December alone, according to a survey conducted by the Blackbaud Institute. And while the holidays are traditionally a time to reflect …
1 2 3 219 220 221

Get in Touch

In just 15 minutes we can get to know your situation, then connect you with an advisor committed to helping you pursue true wealth.

Schedule a Consultation